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Game of Drones
L'actualité concernant les drones civils a été riche ce mois de septembre. Petit tour d'horizon dans Bilan.


textually.org

App flashes lights to help deaf users catch phone calls
A new smartphone app empowers deaf people to “hear” through coloured lights when a phone is ringing, and then have a conversation via sign language interpreters. The Telegraph reports.

quotemarksright.jpgThe Convo Lights app works with Philips Hue, the Wi-Fi enabled light bulbs which can be made to change colour or turn off and on via a smartphone app. Hue is largely designed for aesthetics but Convo has given it new abilities by flashing the lights or displaying certain colours when an incoming phone call is detected.

Since the launch of Philips Hue last year third-party developers worldwide have created nearly 200 complimentary apps.

The new app from Convo, a deaf-owned and operated company providing video phone and translation services to the deaf community, allows users to create personalised ringtones of light to identify incoming callers, and adjust the brightness in a room to make sign language easier to see onscreen.

Convo also provides a service which allows deaf people to communicate over the phone with hearing people in real time via a sign language interpreter, which is built into the app.quotesmarksleft.jpg

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3DPrinting

The $1,200 Machine That Lets Anyone Make a Metal Gun at Home

When Cody Wilson revealed the world’s first fully 3-D printed gun last year, he showed that the “maker” movement has enabled anyone to create a working, lethal firearm with a click in the privacy of his or her garage. Now he’s moved on to a new form of digital DIY gunsmithing. And this time the results aren’t made of plastic. Wired reports.

quotemarksright.jpgWilson’s latest radically libertarian project is a PC-connected milling machine he calls the Ghost Gunner. Like any computer-numerically-controlled (or CNC) mill, the one-foot-cubed black box uses a drill bit mounted on a head that moves in three dimensions to automatically carve digitally-modeled shapes into polymer, wood or aluminum. But this CNC mill, sold by Wilson’s organization known as Defense Distributed for $1,200, is designed to create one object in particular: the component of an AR-15 rifle known as its lower receiver.

That simple chunk of metal has become the epicenter of a gun control firestorm. A lower receiver is the body of the gun that connects its stock, barrel, magazine and other parts. As such, it’s also the rifle’s most regulated element. Mill your own lower receiver at home, however, and you can order the rest of the parts from online gun shops, creating a semi-automatic weapon with no serial number, obtained with no background check, no waiting period or other regulatory hurdles. Some gun control advocates call it a “ghost gun.” Selling that untraceable gun body is illegal, but no law prevents you from making one.

Exploiting the legal loophole around lower receivers isn’t a new idea for gun enthusiasts—some hobbyist gunsmiths have been making their own AR-15 bodies for years. But Wilson, for whom the Ghost Gunner is only the latest in a series of anti-regulatory provocations, is determined to make the process easier and more accessible than ever before.quotesmarksleft.jpg

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